Monthly Archives: August 2016

A Visit to Stratford upon Avon

I always enjoy visiting Stratford upon Avon, it’s less than an hour from my home so I do go every now and then. It’s always a pleasure to walk around, there are always some street entertainers, all I need is a walk and a Coffee and I really enjoy my day.

Stratford upon Avon

This Opera singer broke out in to amazing voice just in front of a cafe’ he didn’t look prepared and certainly wasn’t dressed to entertain, but his voice was amazing!

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The Forth Bridge

On my journey south from John o’ Groats, I drove continually past Inverness,  then through the stunning Cairngorms National Park, past Perth and then on to Edinburgh. By the time I reached Edinburgh, it was almost dark, but as I crossed the Forth road bridge, I could not help staring at the Forth Rail Bridge, even though I had seen images of it, when I was crossing the Firth of Fourth, it was an amazing site. Continue reading

Loch Lomond to John o' Groats

Screenshot 2016-08-22 15.09.09

After passing through Glasgow, I headed north on the A82 towards Glencoe. I was actually in search of the location of that amazing shot in the movie Skyfall, but I was not to be blessed with good weather, it rained almost non stop from the minute I crossed the border. Continue reading

Anderton Boat Lift

Anderton Lift

The Anderton Boat Lift is a two caisson lift lock near the village of Anderton, Cheshire, in north-west England. It provides a 50-foot (15.2 m) vertical link between two navigable waterways: the River Weaver and the Trent and Mersey Canal. The structure is designated as a Scheduled Monument, and is included in the National Heritage List for England. Continue reading

Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian’s Wall (Latin: Vallum Aelium), also called the Roman Wall, begun in 122 AD in the reign of the emperor Hadrian. It ran from the banks of the River Tyne near the North Sea to the Solway Firth on the Irish Sea, and was the northern limit of the Roman Empire.

Hadrian's Wall

It had a stone base and a stone wall. There were milecastles with two turrets in between. There was a fort about every five Roman miles. From north to south, the wall comprised a ditch, wall, military way and vallum, another ditch with adjoining mounds. It is thought the milecastles were staffed with static garrisons, whereas the forts had fighting garrisons of infantry and cavalry. In addition to the wall’s defensive military role, its gates may have been customs posts. Continue reading

Chirk & Pontcysyllte Aqueducts

The Llangollen Canal (Welsh: Camlas Llangollen) is a navigable canal crossing the border between England and Wales. The waterway links Llangollen in Denbighshire, north Wales, with Hurleston in south Cheshire, via the town of Ellesmere, Shropshire.

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Ironbridge

Ironbridge is a village on the river Severn, that is a major part of the industrial revolution. It was here that advances in producing Iron by smelting with Coke began, a technique that allowed much purer and stronger Iron to be produced. Continue reading