Travel

Greek Evzones

The origins of the traditional uniform that the Evzones wear are closely tied to Greek military history. In fact, the term can be traced all the way back to Homer’s time, which indicates that the Evzone soldiers were present in some capacity in Ancient Greece. Today, the Evzones take on a ceremonial role. One of their main duties is to guard the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Athens. In many ways, their role is a symbolic one and their uniform is the very embodiment of Greece’s military legacy.

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A trip to Athens

Flying in to Eleftherios Venizelos airport was really exciting, I had not flown in to that airport before, the last time I flew to Athens, I had flown into the now abandoned Ellinikon International Airport.

The Metro line 3 runs from the airport right in to central Athens, I was staying very near Karaiskaki Square in a district known as ‘Metaxourgeio’

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A Visit to Stratford upon Avon

I always enjoy visiting Stratford upon Avon, it’s less than an hour from my home so I do go every now and then. It’s always a pleasure to walk around, there are always some street entertainers, all I need is a walk and a Coffee and I really enjoy my day.

Stratford upon Avon

This Opera singer broke out in to amazing voice just in front of a cafe’ he didn’t look prepared and certainly wasn’t dressed to entertain, but his voice was amazing!

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The Forth Bridge

On my journey south from John o' Groats, I drove continually past Inverness,  then through the stunning Cairngorms National Park, past Perth and then on to Edinburgh. By the time I reached Edinburgh, it was almost dark, but as I crossed the Forth road bridge, I could not help staring at the Forth Rail Bridge, even though I had seen images of it, when I was crossing the Firth of Fourth, it was an amazing site.

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Loch Lomond to John o' Groats

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After passing through Glasgow, I headed north on the A82 towards Glencoe. I was actually in search of the location of that amazing shot in the movie Skyfall, but I was not to be blessed with good weather, it rained almost non stop from the minute I crossed the border. Continue reading

Anderton Boat Lift

Anderton Lift

The Anderton Boat Lift is a two caisson lift lock near the village of Anderton, Cheshire, in north-west England. It provides a 50-foot (15.2 m) vertical link between two navigable waterways: the River Weaver and the Trent and Mersey Canal. The structure is designated as a Scheduled Monument, and is included in the National Heritage List for England. Continue reading

Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian’s Wall (Latin: Vallum Aelium), also called the Roman Wall, begun in 122 AD in the reign of the emperor Hadrian. It ran from the banks of the River Tyne near the North Sea to the Solway Firth on the Irish Sea, and was the northern limit of the Roman Empire.

Hadrian's Wall

It had a stone base and a stone wall. There were milecastles with two turrets in between. There was a fort about every five Roman miles. From north to south, the wall comprised a ditch, wall, military way and vallum, another ditch with adjoining mounds. It is thought the milecastles were staffed with static garrisons, whereas the forts had fighting garrisons of infantry and cavalry. In addition to the wall’s defensive military role, its gates may have been customs posts. Continue reading

Ironbridge

Ironbridge is a village on the river Severn, that is a major part of the industrial revolution. It was here that advances in producing Iron by smelting with Coke began, a technique that allowed much purer and stronger Iron to be produced. Continue reading

Petra tou Romiou

Petra tou Romiou

Birthplace of Aphrodite

Cyprus is renowned as the island of beauty. The “Petra tou Romiou” area is one of the most beautiful coastlines in Cyprus, where, according to mythology, Aphrodite rose from the waves. The Greek name “Petra tou Romiou” (“the Rock of the Greek”) is associated with the legendary Byzantine hero, Digenis Akritas, who, according to legend, kept the marauding Saracen Arabs (7th-10th centuries) at bay with his amazing strength. With one hand he was said to have grabbed hold of the Kyreneia mountain range thereby forming “Pentadaktylos”, the Five Finger mountain, while with the other hand he heaved a huge rock and tossed it into the sea at the Saracens who were trying to land. The rock still remains and thus gave the region its name. The site is a stop on the Aphrodite Cultural route. Continue reading

Meteora, Greece

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Medieval Greek Orthodox monasteries, built on top of stunning sandstone peaks.